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CS Colloquium (BMAC)
 

The Department of Computer Science of Colorado State University, in cooperation with ISTeC (Information Science and Technology Center), offers the CS Colloquium series as a service to all who are interested in computer science. Most seminars are scheduled for Monday 11:00 AM -- 11:50 AM in CSB 130 or Morgan Library Event Hall. For help finding the locations of our seminar meetings, consult the on-line CSU campus map.map

For questions about this page or to schedule talks, please contact Sangmi Lee Pallickara (sangmi AT colostate dot edu). Here is a list of past seminar schedules.

CS692 Info: [Link]

 

Upcoming Events


May
6

Schulzrinne

Colorado State University Special Joint Electrical and Computer Engineering Department & Computer Science Department Seminar
Power Grid Resilience against Natural Hazards

Speaker:
Salman Mohagheghi, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines

When:
11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, May 6, 2019

Where: CSB130

Contact: Ali Pezeshki (pezeshki@engr.colostate.edu)

Abstract: The colossal amount of energy released by natural disaster events can devastate the critical infrastructure of the affected cities and rural regions. Possible damages to the electric power grid can lead to large-scale interruption in electric service which could take anywhere from a few days to several months to restore. The operation and availability of medical facilities, water sanitation plants, sewage systems, telecommunication networks, transportation systems, and emergency management systems can all be disrupted as a result of sustained loss of power. This can significantly impede post-disaster relief efforts, which further signifies the role of the power grid as one of the main pillars of civic resilience against natural hazards. To be resilient, the grid needs to be able to withstand the damages with minimal cost and limited interruption in service. This can be achieved in three stages: before the event, by means of reinforcement strategies and redundant designs, during the course the event, through risk-based dispatch of energy resources, and in the aftermath of the event, through electric service restoration. Each of these solutions could potentially introduce a multi-objective mixed-integer nonlinear optimization problem that must be solved in the presence of model and parameter uncertainties. In this presentation, some of these solutions will be presented along with discussions on existing challenges and possibilities for future research.     


Bio: Salman Mohagheghi received the B.Sc. from University of Tehran, Iran, M.Sc. from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, and PhD from Georgia Institute of Technology, all in Electrical Engineering. Currently, he is an Associate Professor at the Electrical Engineering Department at the Colorado School of Mines. Prior to joining Mines, he was a Senior R&D Scientist at ABB Corporate Research Center, Raleigh, NC from 2007 to 2010. His current research focuses on situational awareness, power grid resilience against natural and manmade hazards, communication networks for utility automation, and data analytics.



May
10

cs

Computer Science Department Seminar
CS793 Research Seminar Presentation

Speaker:
Students in CS793

When:
11:00AM ~ 12:30PM, Friday May 10, 2019

Where: CSB 130

 




CS Colloquium Schedule, Spring 2019



Jan
28

cs Computer Science Department Colloquium
The CS Graduate Program: Q&A
Speakers:
Sanjay Rajopadhye, Professor, Graduate Director, Department of Computer Science, Colorado State University
Chuck Anderson, Professor, Department of Computer Science, Colorado State University
Sangmi Pallickara, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, January 28, 2019

Where: CSB130 map

Abstract: This is an informational talk about the Computer Science Graduate Program with a Q&A session.



Feb
4

Derrien Computer Science Department Colloquium
Pushing the limits of hardware acceleration
Speaker: Steven Derrien, Professor, Joint EE/CS department, University of Rennes 1, France
When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, February 4, 2019

Where: CSB130

Abstract: FPGA and ASIC hardware accelerators are now finding their way into datacenters and cloud computing architectures. Such devices significantly outperform CPUs and GPUs for many workloads, either from the performance or energy efficiency point of view.>>Read More

Bio: Steven Derrien is a professor in the joint EE/CS departement at University of Rennes 1 in France. He is also a member of the CAIRN research group at IRISA/INRIA. His research interests revolve around High Level Synthesis of non programmable hardware accelerators and hardware design in general.

Video




Feb
26

Chaturvedi Computer Science Department Special Seminar
Structured Approaches to Natural Language Understanding 

Speaker:
Snigdha Chaturvedi, Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz

When:
11:00AM ~ 12:00PM, February 26, 2019

Where:
Plant Science(PSCI) C-101 
 
Contact:
Asa Ben-Hur (
asa@cs.colostate.edu)

Abstract: Despite recent advancements in Natural Language Processing, computers today cannot understand text in the ways that humans can. My research aims at creating computational methods that not only read but also understand text. To accomplish this, I develop machine-learning methods that incorporate linguistic cues as well as the context in which they appear to understand language. >>Read More

Bio: Snigdha Chaturvedi is an Assistant Professor in the department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She specializes in the field of Natural Language Processing with an emphasis on developing methods for natural language understanding. >>Read More

Video


Feb
28

Fioretto Computer Science Department Special Seminar
Privacy in the field: Protecting Sensitive Data for AI Applications 

Speaker:
Ferdinando Fioretto, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Industrial and System Engineering (ISyE) department, Georgia Institute of Technology

When: 2:00PM ~ 3:00PM, February 28, 2019

Where: Clark A-202

Contact: Asa Ben-Hur (asa@cs.colostate.edu)

Abstract: Advances in artificial intelligence and data science have allowed the development of products that leverage individuals' data to provide valuable services. However, the use of this massive quantity of personal information raises fundamental privacy concerns. Differential Privacy (DP) has emerged as the de-facto standard to addresses the sensitivity of such information and can be used to release privacy-preserving datasets. >>Read More

Bio: Ferdinando Fioretto is a postdoctoral researcher at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research focuses on artificial intelligence, data privacy, and multiagent coordination. Ferdinando has published in several top-ranked artificial intelligence journals and conferences. >>Read More
 

Video


Mar
6

Srivastava Computer Science Department Special Seminar
Conversational Machine Learning

Speaker:
Shashank Srivastava, AI Resident, Microsoft Research, Redmond, NLP and Deep Learning Groups 

When: 9:00AM -10:00AM, March 6, 2019 
Where: Clark A-203

Contact: Asa Ben-Hur (asa@cs.colostate.edu)

Abstract: Humans can efficiently learn and communicate new knowledge about the world through natural language (e.g, the concept of important emails may be described through explanations like ‘late night emails from my boss are usually important’). Can machines be similarly taught new tasks and behavior through natural language interactions with their users? In this talk, we'll explore two approaches towards language-based learning for classifications tasks.  >>Read More

Bio: Shashank Srivastava recently received his PhD from the Machine Learning department at CMU in 2018, and currently works at Microsoft Research. Shashank's research interests lie in conversational learning, interactive AI and grounded language understanding, and his dissertation focuses on helping machines learn from human interactions. >>Read More  

Video

Mar
11



cs Computer Science Department Seminar
Scalable AUC Maximization Algorithms

Speaker:
Majdi Khaled Alnnfiai, Ph.D Candidate, Computer Science Department, Colorado State University

When:
11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, March 11, 2019

Where:
CSB 130

Abstract:

Classification is a major task in machine learning and data mining applications. Many of these applications involve building a classification model using a large volume of imbalanced data. In such an imbalanced learning scenario, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) has proven to be a reliable performance measure to evaluate a classifier. Therefore, it is desirable to develop scalable learning algorithms that maximize the AUC metric directly.

In this talk, I will present scalable algorithms we designed for AUC maximization. In an online setting, we develop second-order AUC maximization algorithms based on a confidence-weighted model. The proposed algorithms exploit the second-order information to improve the convergence rate and implement a fixed-size buffer to address the multivariate nature of the AUC objective function. In a stochastic setting, we propose a fast convergence algorithm accelerated using a unique combination of scheduled regularization update and scheduled averaging. I will also describe a proximal variant of our accelerated stochastic AUC maximization algorithm.


Mar
14

McClurg Computer Science Department Special Seminar
Program Synthesis for Software-Defined Networking

Speaker: 
Jedidiah McClurg, Assistant Professor, Computer Science, University of New Mexico

When:
2:00PM ~ 3:00PM, March 14, Thursday, 2019

Where:
CLARK A202

Contact:
Wim Bohm (bohm@cs.colostate.edu)

Abstract:

Transient network bugs such as forwarding loops or black holes can cause problems that range from mildly annoying (degraded quality while watching Netflix) to catastrophic (data loss, security breaches, downtime). Software-defined networking (SDN) offers a new level of network programmability, enabling such bugs to be tackled using custom software, but unfortunately, current SDN programming platforms have a key limitation—they lack mechanisms for correctly changing the global configuration (the set of all forwarding rules on the switches). >>Read More  

Bio:
Jedidiah (Jed) McClurg is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of New Mexico, and received his Ph.D. from the CUPLV group at the University of Colorado Boulder in 2018. He is currently working on research in synthesis and verification of software-defined network (SDN) programs, but has broad interest in programming languages, formal methods, and networking. >>Read More 


Video


MAR
25

Lee Computer Science Department Special Seminar
A Systems Perspective of Data-driven Smart Cities

Speaker: 
Stephen Lee, Ph.D. Candidate, College of Information and Computer Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst

When:
2:00PM ~ 3:00PM, March 25, Monday, 2019

Where:
CLARK A204

Contact:
Wim Bohm (bohm@cs.colostate.edu)

Abstract:

The rise of low-cost sensors and the ubiquitous Internet have led to the unprecedented deployments of the Internet of things (IoT) devices. >>Read More  

Bio:
Stephen Lee is a final year Ph.D. student in the College of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, advised by Prof. Prashant Shenoy. >>Read More  


Video



MAR
27

Bhimani Computer Science Department Special Seminar
New Storage Technologies for Big Data Processing on Cloud and Data Center Infrastructures

Speaker: 
Janki Bhimani, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University

When:
2:00PM ~ 3:00PM, Wednesday March 27, 2019

Where: CLARK A202

Contact:
Wim Bohm (bohm@cs.colostate.edu)

Abstract:

A new era of “Data Age” is approaching today. Data is the fuel for analytics of all the emerging technologies of Internet-of-Things (IoT) and cloud computing. Data management plays a critical role in delivering real-world impacts. However, it is challenging for any systems to efficiently manage data to achieve low latency, high throughput, and good endurance.  >>Read More  

Bio: Janki Bhimani is a fifth-year Ph.D. student from Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Northeastern University. She got her B.S. in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from GITAM University in 2013 and her M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Northeastern University in 2014. >>Read More  


Video



Mar
25

Berry ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
The Data Intensive University: The Idea of a University in a Digital Age

Speaker:
David Berry, Professor, Digital Humanities (Media and Film), School of Media, film and Music, University of Sussex

When:
11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, March 25, 2019

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Jonathan E. Carlyon (Jonathan.Carlyon@ColoState.EDU)

Abstract: In a digital age the university needs to communicate humanistic values and its contribution to public culture more than ever. The university is particularly important for continuing to ask the question: what is a life worth living? Today we live within a horizon of interpretability determined in large part by the capture of data by algorithms which overtake our lives and thoughts. >>Read More

Bio:
Dr. Berry researches the theoretical and medium-specific challenges of understanding digital and computational media, particularly algorithms, software and code. His work draws on digital humanities, critical theory, political economy, social theory, software studies, and the philosophy of technology. >>Read More

Mar
26

Berry Computer Science Department and Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Colloquium
Explainability and the Data Intensive University

Speaker:
David Berry, Professor, Digital Humanities (Media and Film), School of Media, film and Music, University of Sussex

When:
4:00PM ~ 5:00PM, Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Where: BSB A101

Contact: Jonathan E. Carlyon (Jonathan.Carlyon@ColoState.EDU)

Abstract: In the UK, the Data Protection Act 2018 has come into force, which was the enabling legislation for the European GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation). It has been argued that this creates a new right in relation to automated algorithmic systems that requires the "controller" of the algorithm to supply an explanation of how a decision was made to the user (or "data subject") – the social right to explanation. >>Read More
 
Bio: Dr. Berry researches the theoretical and medium-specific challenges of understanding digital and computational media, particularly algorithms, software and code. His work draws on digital humanities, critical theory, political economy, social theory, software studies, and the philosophy of technology. >>Read More

Apr
1

prabhu Computer Science Department Colloquium
Formal Methods for the Development of Robust Cyber-Physical Systems

Speaker:
Vinayak Prabhu, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department, Colorado State University

When: 11:00PM ~ 11:50AM, Monday, April 1, 2019

Where: CSB 130

Abstract: Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) incorporate integration of control software, physical sensors and physical hardware in which computing devices interact with the physical world in a feedback loop, such as in avionics, self-driving cars, or in medical devices. While system correctness has always been a desired property, bugs in safety-critical systems are particularly unacceptable as they can have catastrophic consequences.
Techniques from the formal methods community from Computer Science have recently emerged as a toolset which can aid "correct-by-construction" design, and can enhance traditional testing approaches for developing more robust systems. I will give an overview of some of the approaches I have used in my research.

 
Bio: Vinayak Prabhu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at CSU. He has worked as a researcher in the Real-Time Systems group at the University of Pennsylvania, in the Underwater Systems and Technologies Laboratory at the University of Porto (Portugal), and in the Rigorous Software Engineering group at the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems in Germany. His research interests are in using formal methods techniques for the design and analysis of robust systems; in particular in the design, verification, testing, and control of models of Cyber-Physical Systems.


Video




 

Apr
8

Fosdick
Computer Science Department Colloquium
Inferring latent networks from longitudinal relational data

Speaker:
Bailey Fosdick, Assistant Professor, Department of Statistics, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, Monday, April 8, 2019

Where: CSB 130

Abstract: Longitudinal bipartite relational data characterize the evolution of relations between pairs of actors, where actors are of two distinct types and relations exist only between disparate types. A common goal is to understand the temporal dependencies, specifically which actor relations incite later actor relations. There are two existing approaches to this problem. The first approach projects the bipartite data in each time period to a unipartite network and uses existing unipartite network models. Unfortunately, information is lost in calculating the projection and generative models for networks obtained through this process are scarce. The second approach represents dependencies using two unipartite influence networks, corresponding to the two actor types. Existing models taking this approach are bilinear in the influence networks, creating challenges in computation and interpretation. We propose a novel generative model that permits estimation of weighted, directed influence networks and does not suffer from these shortcomings. The proposed model is linear in the influence networks, permitting inference using off-the-shelf software tools. We prove our estimator is consistent under cases of model misspecification. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed model in simulation studies and an analysis of weekly international state interactions. This is joint work with Frank Marrs, Skyler Cranmer, Benjamin Campbell and Tobias Bohmelt.


Bio: Bailey Fosdick is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Statistics at Colorado State University. She completed her Ph.D. in the Department of Statistics at the University of Washington and spent a year as a postdoctoral fellow at the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute. Her primary research interests lie in developing statistical methodology to analyze network data, covariance models for multiway data, and applications of Bayesian methodology in the social sciences.



Apr
8

Beverly
Computer Science Department Special Seminar
Protocols, infrastructure, and fragility: new perspectives on Internet routing resilience
Speaker: 
Robert Beverly, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, Naval Postgraduate School (NPS)

When: 2:00PM ~ 2:50PM, Monday April 8, 2019

Where: CLARK A202

Contact: Wim Bohm (bohm@cs.colostate.edu)

Abstract:
While routing is fundamental to the functionality of the Internet, empirical evidence demonstrates that this critical infrastructure is often and easily disrupted. >>Read More

Bio:
Dr. Robert Beverly is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, CA. He and his students focus on problems in network architecture, measurement, and security. >>Read More

Apr
15

Bowman


ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
Augmented Reality as the Future of Personal Computing

Speaker:
Doug Bowman, Frank J. Maher Professor and Director of f the Center for Human-Computer Interaction,Computer Science, Virginia Tech.

When:
11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, April 15, 2019

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Francisco Ortega (fortega@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Personal computing went through a revolution just over a decade ago with the introduction of the smartphone. In this talk, I will argue that we are on the cusp of another huge change in the way we consume and interact with information—that augmented reality (AR) has the potential to replace not only our smartphones, but also our tablets, our desktops, and our TVs. >>Read More

Bio: Doug A. Bowman is the Frank J. Maher Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Center for Human-Computer Interaction at Virginia Tech. He is the principal investigator of the 3D Interaction Group, focusing on the topics of three-dimensional user interface design and the benefits of immersion in virtual environments. >>Read More

 

Apr
15

Bowman ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
Immersive Analytics Beyond Visualization


Speaker:
Doug Bowman, Frank J. Maher Professor and Director of f the Center for Human-Computer Interaction,Computer Science, Virginia Tech.

When:
3:00PM ~ 4:00PM, April 15, 2019

Where: CSB130

Contact: Francisco Ortega (fortega@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Analyzing big data for actionable insights is one of today’s critical challenges in computing. Neither human analysts nor automated algorithms alone have the ability to answer subtle, deep questions from very large abstract datasets. >>Read More

Bio: Doug A. Bowman is the Frank J. Maher Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Center for Human-Computer Interaction at Virginia Tech. He is the principal investigator of the 3D Interaction Group, focusing on the topics of three-dimensional user interface design and the benefits of immersion in virtual environments. >>Read More

 

Apr
22

Jha ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
Towards Semantic Adversarial Examples

Speaker:
Somesh Jha, Professor, Computer Science Department, University of Wisconsin

When:
11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, April 22, 2019

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Indrakshi Ray (Indrakshi.Ray@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Fueled by massive amounts of data, models produced by machine-learning (ML) algorithms, especially deep neural networks, are being used in diverse domains where trustworthiness is a concern, including automotive systems, finance, health care, natural language processing, and malware detection.>>Read More

Bio: Somesh Jha received his B.Tech from Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi in Electrical Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1996 under the supervision of Prof. Edmund Clarke (a Turing award winner).>>Read More



Apr
23

Jha ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
Balancing Security-Privacy and Functionality in Software Synthesis

Speaker:
Somesh Jha, Professor, Computer Science Department, University of Wisconsin

When:
9:30AM ~ 10:45 AM Tuesday, April 23

Where: CSB 425

Contact: Indrakshi Ray (Indrakshi.Ray@colostate.edu)

Abstract: The problem of implementing a secure program is an ideal problem domain for formal methods. In this talk, I will be using security as term that encompasses traditional security concepts and also privacy. Even a small error in the logic of a program can drastically weaken the security and privacy guarantees that it provides.>>Read More

Bio: Somesh Jha received his B.Tech from Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi in Electrical Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1996 under the supervision of Prof. Edmund Clarke (a Turing award winner).>>Read More



Apr
29

Schulzrinne ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
Internet beyond packets: network neutrality, rural broadband, spectrum and access for people with disabilities

Speaker:
Henning Schulzrinne, Julian Clarence Levi Professor, Computer Science Department, Columbia University

When:
11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, April 29, 2019

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Anura Jayasumana (Anura.Jayasumana@colostate.edu)

Abstract: The Internet has become one of the most important core infrastructures. Thus, it has raised important new public policy issues, with three different issues illustrating the range of problem. * Network neutrality, in earlier versions, dates back to 1956. Even though it is often seen as being about packet discrimination, it is really about whether Internet service providers get to capture more of the value generated by their networks.>>Read More

Bio: Prof. Henning Schulzrinne, Levi Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University, received his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Massachusetts. He was an MTS at AT&T Bell Laboratories and an associate department head at GMD-Fokus (Berlin), before joining the Computer Science and Electrical Engineering departments at Columbia University.>>Read More



Apr
29

Schulzrinne ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
The Economics of Networks

Speaker:
Henning Schulzrinne, Julian Clarence Levi Professor, Computer Science Department, Columbia University

When:
4:00PM ~ 5:00PM, Monday April 29, 2019

Where: 328-330 Lory Student Center

Contact: Anura Jayasumana (Anura.Jayasumana@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Internet infrastructure is a multi-hundred billion dollar business in the United States alone, but researchers generally ignore the economic aspects of networks. I will discuss the economic models for different types of networks, and how the research community may want to focus on the 85% of the expenses caused by operations rather than capital investment. >>Read More

Bio: Prof. Henning Schulzrinne, Levi Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University, received his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Massachusetts. He was an MTS at AT&T Bell Laboratories and an associate department head at GMD-Fokus (Berlin), before joining the Computer Science and Electrical Engineering departments at Columbia University.>>Read More

CS Colloquium Schedule, Fall 2018



Aug
20

Rajopadhye Computer Science Department Colloquium
The CS Graduate Program: how to thrive
Speaker: Sanjay Rajopadhye, Professor, Graduate Director, Department of Computer Science, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, August 20, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Abstract: This is an informational talk about the Computer Science Graduate Program. I will cover department policies and rules, and also general tips about how succeed in your professional journey. Although targeted for entering graduate students, old timers may find useful tips on funding opportunities, and research paths.

Video


Aug
27

Rajopadhye Computer Science Department Colloquium
CS Faculty Rapid-Fire Presentations of Current Research | Group A
Speakers: Sanjay Rajopadhye, Louis-Noel Pouchet, Hamid Chitsaz, Yashwant Malaiya, Sudipto Ghosh, Shrideep Pallickara, and Sangmi Pallickara, Department of Computer Science, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, August 27, 2018

Where: CSB130 map


Video/ Slides


Sept
10

Miguel Colorado State University Special Joint Electrical and Computer Engineering Department & Computer Science Department Seminar
Helping Conservation of Snow Leopards with Image Processing and Machine Learning
Speaker: Agnieszka Miguel, Associate Professor and Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Seattle University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, September 10, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Contact: Anthony Maciejewski (Anthony.Maciejewski@ColoState.EDU)

Abstract: Camera traps are one of the primary non-invasive population survey methods for studying snow leopards. Conservation biologists first sort camera trap images into sets with snow leopards and those without.>>Read More

Bio: Dr. Miguel received her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2001 from the University of Washington, and MSEE and BSEE from Florida Atlantic University in 1996 and 1994. Dr. Miguel's professional interests involve image processing, machine learning, and engineering education especially diversity and inclusion, retention, recruitment, and active learning. >>Read More

Video



Sept
17

csu-ds Computer Science Department Colloquium
CS Faculty Rapid-Fire Presentations of Current Research | Group B
Speakers: Indrakshi Ray, Indrajit Ray, Laura Moreno Cubillos, Darrell Whitley, Ross McConnell, Asa Ben-Hur, Ross Beveridge, Bruce Draper, Vinayak Prabhu, Chuck Anderson, Department of Computer Science, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, September 17, 2018

Where: CSB130 map


Video



Sept
19

Miguel ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
Big Data in Climate and Earth Sciences: Challenges and Opportunities for Machine Learning
Speaker: Vipin Kumar, Regents Professor and William Norris Endowed Chair, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota

When: 11:00AM ~ 12:00PM, Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Imme Ebert-Uphoff (iebert@colostate.edu)

Abstract: The climate and earth sciences have recently undergone a rapid transformation from a data-poor to a data-rich environment. In particular, massive amount of data about Earth and its environment is now continuously being generated by a large number of Earth observing satellites as well as physics-based earth system models running on large-scale computational platforms.>>Read More

Bio: Vipin Kumar is a Regents Professor and hold the William Norris Chair in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota. >>Read More

Video 1
Video 2


Sept
19

Miguel Computer Science Department and Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Colloquium
Physics Guided Machine Learning: A New Paradigm for Modeling Science and Engineering Problems
Speaker: Vipin Kumar, Regents Professor and William Norris Endowed Chair, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota

When: 2:00PM ~ 3:00PM, Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Imme Ebert-Uphoff (iebert@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Physics-based models of dynamical systems are often used to study engineering and environmental systems. Despite their extensive use, these models have several well-known limitations due to incomplete or inaccurate representations of the physical processes being modeled.>>Read More

Bio: Vipin Kumar is a Regents Professor and hold the William Norris Chair in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota. >>Read More


Sept
24
TED

Miguel Computer Science Department Colloquium
Gestures and Other Modalities for User Interaction for 3D User Interfaces
Speaker: Francisco Ortega, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, September 24, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Abstract: Gesture elicitation and recognition research are important due to the increase of new input modalities in order to improve 3D user interfaces, including virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). >>Read More

Bio: Dr. Francisco R. Ortega is an Assistant Professor at Colorado State University. Dr. Ortega earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science (CS) in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and 3D User Interfaces (3DUI) from Florida International University (FIU). >>Read More

Video



Oct
8

Miguel Computer Science Department Colloquium
Digital Signatures to Ensure the Authenticity and Integrity of Synthetic DNA Molecules
Speaker: Diptendu Kar, Graduate Student, Computer Science Department, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, October 8, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Abstract: DNA synthesis has become increasingly common, and many synthetic DNA molecules are licensed intellectual property (IP). DNA samples are shared between academic labs, ordered from DNA synthesis companies and manipulated for a variety of different purposes, mostly to study their properties and improve upon them. However, it is not uncommon for a sample to change hands many times with very little accompanying information and no proof of origin. >>Read More



Video


Oct
15

Miguel ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
How 2G Computational Social Science Can Revolutionize the Study of 'Dark' Networks
Speaker: Jytte Klausen, Lawrence A. Wien Professor of International Cooperation, Department of Politics, Brandeis University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, October 15, 2018

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Anura Jayasumana (Anura.Jayasumana@ColoState.edu)

Abstract: Klausen will illustrate the utility of computational social science methodologies with examples from her own research on global terrorist networks. >>Read More

Bio: Jytte Klausen, Ph.D. (political science), is the Lawrence A. Wien Professor of International Cooperation at Brandeis University and an Affiliate at the Center for European Studies at Harvard University. >>Read More

Video 1
Video 2


Oct
16

Miguel Computer Science Department and Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Colloquium
The Call of Duty: The Making of a ‘Homegrown’ Terrorist
Speaker: Jytte Klausen, Lawrence A. Wien Professor of International Cooperation, Department of Politics, Brandeis University

When: 4PM ~ 5PM, Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Where: 310, Lory Student Center

Contact: Anura Jayasumana (Anura.Jayasumana@ColoState.edu)

Abstract: “It's actually quite fun. It's really really fun. It's better than that game Call of Duty. It's like that but it's in 3D where everything is happening in front of you." -Abu Sumayyah Al-Britani (2014)
A British foreign fighter with ISIS in Syria and Iraq Klausen will present her research on the social and behavioral dynamics of extremist radicalization and the pathways to terrorism taken by ‘homegrown” American jihadists. >>Read More

Bio: Jytte Klausen, Ph.D. (political science), is the Lawrence A. Wien Professor of International Cooperation at Brandeis University and an Affiliate at the Center for European Studies at Harvard University. >>Read More


Oct
19

Allison Computer Science Department Colloquium
BCIs: New patient groups, applications, and issues
Speaker: Brendan Allison, Visiting Scholar, Cognitive Science Department, University of California, San Diego

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, October 19, Friday, 2018

Where: CSB130

Contact: Chuck Anderson(Chuck.Anderson@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) provide communication without movement. Users instead perform specific mental activities that an electrode cap or other device can detect. Automated tools can translate these activities into messages or commands, providing real-time feedback to the user.>>Read More

Bio: Dr. Allison has been active in EEG research for over 20 years, most of which involved brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. He earned his PhD in Cognitive Science in 2003 at UC San Diego, and has since worked with several top researchers and institutes, including Prof. Wolpaw at the New York State Dept of Health, Prof. Polich at The Scripps Research Institute, and Profs. Pfurtscheller and Neuper at Graz University of Technology. He is a Founding Board Member of the BCI Society and editor of the BCI Journal.>>Read More

Video


Oct
22

Miguel ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
Laws for Cybersecurity?
Speaker: Fred B. Schneider, Eckert Professor of Computer Science, Computer Science, Cornell University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, October 22, 2018

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Indrakshy Ray (Indrakshi.Ray@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Cyber-security today is focused largely on defending against known attacks. We learn about the latest attack and find a patch to defend against it. Our defenses thus improve only after they have been successfully penetrated. This is a recipe to ensure some attackers succeed---not a recipe for achieving system trustworthiness. >>Read More

Bio: Fred B. Schneider is Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University. He joined Cornell's faculty in Fall 1978 and served as department chair from 2014-2018, having completed a Ph.D. at Stony Brook University and a B.S. in Engineering at Cornell in 1975.>>Read More


Oct
23

Miguel Computer Science Department and Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Colloquium
Security from Tags
Speaker: Fred B. Schneider, Eckert Professor of Computer Science, Computer Science, Cornell University

When: 9:30AM ~ 10:30AM, Tuesday, October 23

Where: Clark A 202

Contact: Indrakshy Ray (Indrakshi.Ray@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Reference monitors generally restrict operation invocation. We discuss an alternative approach to security: enforcing restrictions that labels give about how a value may be used. A new class of reactive information flow (RIF) labels is useful, and we describe a static enforcement scheme. We also discuss run-time enforcement for chains of labels, including results that characterize the trade-off between chain length and permissiveness. >>Read More

Bio: Fred B. Schneider is Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University. He joined Cornell's faculty in Fall 1978 and served as department chair from 2014-2018, having completed a Ph.D. at Stony Brook University and a B.S. in Engineering at Cornell in 1975.>>Read More


Oct
29

Quynn Computer Science Department Colloquium
To Clearly Show Where No One Has Gone Before: Craft & Story & Science in Writing
Speaker: Kristina Quynn, Director, CSU Writes, Faculty in English & Graduate School

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, October 29, 2018

Where: CSB130

Abstract: High-quality and influential scientific articles (i.e., cited) and proposals (i.e., funded) contain many of the same features as high-quality and influential science fiction: specific and engaging characters, unexpected happenings, new understandings, and novel beginnings. >>Read More

Bio: Dr. Kristina Quynn is the founding Director of CSU Writes and a faculty member of the English Department and Graduate School at Colorado State University. Through CSU Writes, she works with faculty, postdoc, and graduate student writers from across all colleges and departments at CSU. >>Read More

Video


Nov
5

Partridge Computer Science Department Colloquium
Computing Systems Integrating Silicon Photonics:An Illusion or a Realistic Solution?
Speaker: Mahdi Nikdast, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, November 5, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Abstract: Computing systems play an important role in our daily lives. They are continuously scaling, and hence becoming more complicated, to satisfy new applications demands, such as higher computation and communication bandwidth required for big data and machine learning applications.>>Read More

Bio: Mahdi Nikdast is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Colorado State University (CSU). He received his Ph.D. in Electronic and Computer Engineering from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Hong Kong, in 2014. After his Ph.D., he started a Postdoctoral at Polytechnique Montreal and in collaboration with McGill University in Montreal, Canada.>>Read More

Video


Nov
26

Partridge Computer Science Department Colloquium
Creating a National Wireless Research Testbed
Speaker: Craig Partridge, Professor & Department Chair, Computer Science Department, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, November 26, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Abstract: Imagine that on the campuses of 200 universities it was possible to experiment with new wireless protocols, on almost any radio frequency you wanted, without getting a license. Further imagine that any grad student could have a fully programmable experimental radio with which to conduct those experiments and that it was possible to buy more radios at a reasonable cost. For the past few years I've been working to make that vision a reality and in the past year I've been part of a team funded by NSF to plan our way towards the vision. In this talk I'll present the vision, how to make it reality, and discuss some of the research innovations we expect such a testbed might enable.

Bio: Dr. Craig Partridge is chair of the department of Computer Science at Colorado State University. Before he came to CSU, he was chief scientist for networking research at Raytheon BBN Technologies. Craig is a Fellow of the IEEE and ACM, a former chair of ACM SIGCOMM, and a member of the Internet Hall of Fame.

Video


Dec
3

Quinton Computer Science Department Colloquium
Revisiting Alpha and its Semantics
Speaker: Patrice Quinton, Patrice Quinton, Professor Emeritus, Ecole normale supérieure de Rennes, France (joint work with Tomofumi Yuki, INRIA researcher, Rennes)

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, December 3, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Contact: Sanjay Rajopadhye (Sanjay.Rajopadhye@ColoState.EDU)

Abstract: Alpha was designed in 1989 by Christophe Mauras to represent affine recurrence equations and to model the process of parallel architecture synthesis. Alpha is a specialized functional language, where computations are represented as fonctions on polyhedral domains. Alpha has been the basis of research on the so-called polyhedral model, both at IRISA Rennes, and at CSU by Prof. Rajopadhye’s research group. Prototype tools — MMAlpha in Rennes, Alphaz at CSU — were developed to target the generation of parallel code or the synthesis of parallel circuits. In this talk, I will present ongoing research aiming at revisiting the semantics of Alpha, in particular, concerning the structuration of the language using subsystems of equations. The goal of this research is to provide good foundations to the design of parallel programs or architectures using structured approaches using Alpha.

Bio: Patrice Quinton is Professor Emeritus at Ecole normale supérieure de Rennes (France), and member of IRISA. Former professor at Université de Rennes 1, and CNRS research director, he has been heading ENS Rennes from 2004 to 2015. His research interests are parallel architectures and high-level synthesis of hardware.


Dec
3

Singh Computer Science Department Colloquium
Rate Adaptive Wide Area Networks
Speaker: Rachee Singh, PhD Student, Computer Science, UMASS Amherst

When: 12:00PM ~ 1:00PM, December 3, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Contact: Craig Partridge (Craig.Partridge@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Fiber optic cables connecting data centers are an expensive but important resource for large organizations. Their importance has driven a conservative deployment approach, with redundancy and reliability baked in at multiple layers. In this work, we take a more aggressive approach and argue for adapting the capacity of fiber optic links based on their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We investigate this idea by analyzing the SNR of over 8,000 links in an optical backbone for a period of three years. We show that the capacity of 64% of 100 Gbps IP links can be augmented by at least 75 Gbps. Moreover, adapting link capacity to a lower rate can prevent up to 25% of link failures. Our analysis shows that using the same links, we get higher capacity, better availability, and 32% lower cost per gigabit per second. To accomplish this, we propose Rate Adaptive WAN (RADWAN), a traffic engineering system that allows optical links to adapt their rate based on the observed SNR to achieve higher throughput and availability while minimizing the churn during capacity reconfigurations. We evaluate RADWAN using a testbed consisting of 1,540 km fiber with 16 amplifiers and attenuators. We then simulate the throughput gains of RADWAN at scale and compare them to the gains of state-of-the-art traffic engineering systems. Our data-driven simulations show that RADWAN improves the overall network throughput by 40% while also improving the average link availability.

Web Page: http://www.racheesingh.com


Dec
7

Rajopadhye Computer Science Department Colloquium
CS793 Rapid Fire Presentation
Speakers: CS793 Graduate Students

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, Dec 7, 2018

Where: CSB130 map