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CS Colloquium (BMAC)
 

The Department of Computer Science of Colorado State University, in cooperation with ISTeC (Information Science and Technology Center), offers the CS Colloquium series as a service to all who are interested in computer science. Most seminars are scheduled for Monday 11:00 AM -- 11:50 AM in CSB 130 or Morgan Library Event Hall. For help finding the locations of our seminar meetings, consult the on-line CSU campus map.map

For questions about this page or to schedule talks, please contact Sangmi Lee Pallickara (sangmi AT colostate dot edu). Here is a list of past seminar schedules.

CS692 Info: [Link]

 

Upcoming Events


Dec
3

Quinton Computer Science Department Colloquium
Revisiting Alpha and its Semantics
Speaker: Patrice Quinton, Patrice Quinton, Professor Emeritus, Ecole normale supérieure de Rennes, France (joint work with Tomofumi Yuki, INRIA researcher, Rennes)

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, December 3, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Contact: Sanjay Rajopadhye (Sanjay.Rajopadhye@ColoState.EDU)

Abstract: Alpha was designed in 1989 by Christophe Mauras to represent affine recurrence equations and to model the process of parallel architecture synthesis. Alpha is a specialized functional language, where computations are represented as fonctions on polyhedral domains. Alpha has been the basis of research on the so-called polyhedral model, both at IRISA Rennes, and at CSU by Prof. Rajopadhye’s research group. Prototype tools — MMAlpha in Rennes, Alphaz at CSU — were developed to target the generation of parallel code or the synthesis of parallel circuits. In this talk, I will present ongoing research aiming at revisiting the semantics of Alpha, in particular, concerning the structuration of the language using subsystems of equations. The goal of this research is to provide good foundations to the design of parallel programs or architectures using structured approaches using Alpha.

Bio: Patrice Quinton is Professor Emeritus at Ecole normale supérieure de Rennes (France), and member of IRISA. Former professor at Université de Rennes 1, and CNRS research director, he has been heading ENS Rennes from 2004 to 2015. His research interests are parallel architectures and high-level synthesis of hardware.


Dec
3

Singh Computer Science Department Colloquium
Rate Adaptive Wide Area Networks
Speaker: Rachee Singh, PhD Student, Computer Science, UMASS Amherst

When: 12:00PM ~ 1:00PM, December 3, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Contact: Craig Partridge (Craig.Partridge@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Fiber optic cables connecting data centers are an expensive but important resource for large organizations. Their importance has driven a conservative deployment approach, with redundancy and reliability baked in at multiple layers. In this work, we take a more aggressive approach and argue for adapting the capacity of fiber optic links based on their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We investigate this idea by analyzing the SNR of over 8,000 links in an optical backbone for a period of three years. We show that the capacity of 64% of 100 Gbps IP links can be augmented by at least 75 Gbps. Moreover, adapting link capacity to a lower rate can prevent up to 25% of link failures. Our analysis shows that using the same links, we get higher capacity, better availability, and 32% lower cost per gigabit per second. To accomplish this, we propose Rate Adaptive WAN (RADWAN), a traffic engineering system that allows optical links to adapt their rate based on the observed SNR to achieve higher throughput and availability while minimizing the churn during capacity reconfigurations. We evaluate RADWAN using a testbed consisting of 1,540 km fiber with 16 amplifiers and attenuators. We then simulate the throughput gains of RADWAN at scale and compare them to the gains of state-of-the-art traffic engineering systems. Our data-driven simulations show that RADWAN improves the overall network throughput by 40% while also improving the average link availability.

Web Page: http://www.racheesingh.com


CS Colloquium Schedule, Fall 2018



Aug
20

Rajopadhye Computer Science Department Colloquium
The CS Graduate Program: how to thrive
Speaker: Sanjay Rajopadhye, Professor, Graduate Director, Department of Computer Science, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, August 20, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Abstract: This is an informational talk about the Computer Science Graduate Program. I will cover department policies and rules, and also general tips about how succeed in your professional journey. Although targeted for entering graduate students, old timers may find useful tips on funding opportunities, and research paths.

Video


Aug
27

Rajopadhye Computer Science Department Colloquium
CS Faculty Rapid-Fire Presentations of Current Research | Group A
Speakers: Sanjay Rajopadhye, Louis-Noel Pouchet, Hamid Chitsaz, Yashwant Malaiya, Sudipto Ghosh, Shrideep Pallickara, and Sangmi Pallickara, Department of Computer Science, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, August 27, 2018

Where: CSB130 map


Video/ Slides


Sept
10

Miguel Colorado State University Special Joint Electrical and Computer Engineering Department & Computer Science Department Seminar
Helping Conservation of Snow Leopards with Image Processing and Machine Learning
Speaker: Agnieszka Miguel, Associate Professor and Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Seattle University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, September 10, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Contact: Anthony Maciejewski (Anthony.Maciejewski@ColoState.EDU)

Abstract: Camera traps are one of the primary non-invasive population survey methods for studying snow leopards. Conservation biologists first sort camera trap images into sets with snow leopards and those without.>>Read More

Bio: Dr. Miguel received her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2001 from the University of Washington, and MSEE and BSEE from Florida Atlantic University in 1996 and 1994. Dr. Miguel's professional interests involve image processing, machine learning, and engineering education especially diversity and inclusion, retention, recruitment, and active learning. >>Read More

Video



Sept
17

csu-ds Computer Science Department Colloquium
CS Faculty Rapid-Fire Presentations of Current Research | Group B
Speakers: Indrakshi Ray, Indrajit Ray, Laura Moreno Cubillos, Darrell Whitley, Ross McConnell, Asa Ben-Hur, Ross Beveridge, Bruce Draper, Vinayak Prabhu, Chuck Anderson, Department of Computer Science, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, September 17, 2018

Where: CSB130 map


Video



Sept
19

Miguel ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
Big Data in Climate and Earth Sciences: Challenges and Opportunities for Machine Learning
Speaker: Vipin Kumar, Regents Professor and William Norris Endowed Chair, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota

When: 11:00AM ~ 12:00PM, Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Imme Ebert-Uphoff (iebert@colostate.edu)

Abstract: The climate and earth sciences have recently undergone a rapid transformation from a data-poor to a data-rich environment. In particular, massive amount of data about Earth and its environment is now continuously being generated by a large number of Earth observing satellites as well as physics-based earth system models running on large-scale computational platforms.>>Read More

Bio: Vipin Kumar is a Regents Professor and hold the William Norris Chair in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota. >>Read More

Video 1
Video 2


Sept
19

Miguel Computer Science Department and Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Colloquium
Physics Guided Machine Learning: A New Paradigm for Modeling Science and Engineering Problems
Speaker: Vipin Kumar, Regents Professor and William Norris Endowed Chair, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota

When: 2:00PM ~ 3:00PM, Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Imme Ebert-Uphoff (iebert@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Physics-based models of dynamical systems are often used to study engineering and environmental systems. Despite their extensive use, these models have several well-known limitations due to incomplete or inaccurate representations of the physical processes being modeled.>>Read More

Bio: Vipin Kumar is a Regents Professor and hold the William Norris Chair in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota. >>Read More


Sept
24
TED

Miguel Computer Science Department Colloquium
Gestures and Other Modalities for User Interaction for 3D User Interfaces
Speaker: Francisco Ortega, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, September 24, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Abstract: Gesture elicitation and recognition research are important due to the increase of new input modalities in order to improve 3D user interfaces, including virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). >>Read More

Bio: Dr. Francisco R. Ortega is an Assistant Professor at Colorado State University. Dr. Ortega earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science (CS) in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and 3D User Interfaces (3DUI) from Florida International University (FIU). >>Read More

Video



Oct
8

Miguel Computer Science Department Colloquium
Digital Signatures to Ensure the Authenticity and Integrity of Synthetic DNA Molecules
Speaker: Diptendu Kar, Graduate Student, Computer Science Department, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, October 8, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Abstract: DNA synthesis has become increasingly common, and many synthetic DNA molecules are licensed intellectual property (IP). DNA samples are shared between academic labs, ordered from DNA synthesis companies and manipulated for a variety of different purposes, mostly to study their properties and improve upon them. However, it is not uncommon for a sample to change hands many times with very little accompanying information and no proof of origin. >>Read More



Video


Oct
15

Miguel ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
How 2G Computational Social Science Can Revolutionize the Study of 'Dark' Networks
Speaker: Jytte Klausen, Lawrence A. Wien Professor of International Cooperation, Department of Politics, Brandeis University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, October 15, 2018

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Anura Jayasumana (Anura.Jayasumana@ColoState.edu)

Abstract: Klausen will illustrate the utility of computational social science methodologies with examples from her own research on global terrorist networks. >>Read More

Bio: Jytte Klausen, Ph.D. (political science), is the Lawrence A. Wien Professor of International Cooperation at Brandeis University and an Affiliate at the Center for European Studies at Harvard University. >>Read More

Video 1
Video 2


Oct
16

Miguel Computer Science Department and Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Colloquium
The Call of Duty: The Making of a ‘Homegrown’ Terrorist
Speaker: Jytte Klausen, Lawrence A. Wien Professor of International Cooperation, Department of Politics, Brandeis University

When: 4PM ~ 5PM, Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Where: 310, Lory Student Center

Contact: Anura Jayasumana (Anura.Jayasumana@ColoState.edu)

Abstract: “It's actually quite fun. It's really really fun. It's better than that game Call of Duty. It's like that but it's in 3D where everything is happening in front of you." -Abu Sumayyah Al-Britani (2014)
A British foreign fighter with ISIS in Syria and Iraq Klausen will present her research on the social and behavioral dynamics of extremist radicalization and the pathways to terrorism taken by ‘homegrown” American jihadists. >>Read More

Bio: Jytte Klausen, Ph.D. (political science), is the Lawrence A. Wien Professor of International Cooperation at Brandeis University and an Affiliate at the Center for European Studies at Harvard University. >>Read More


Oct
19

Allison Computer Science Department Colloquium
BCIs: New patient groups, applications, and issues
Speaker: Brendan Allison, Visiting Scholar, Cognitive Science Department, University of California, San Diego

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, October 19, Friday, 2018

Where: CSB130

Contact: Chuck Anderson(Chuck.Anderson@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) provide communication without movement. Users instead perform specific mental activities that an electrode cap or other device can detect. Automated tools can translate these activities into messages or commands, providing real-time feedback to the user.>>Read More

Bio: Dr. Allison has been active in EEG research for over 20 years, most of which involved brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. He earned his PhD in Cognitive Science in 2003 at UC San Diego, and has since worked with several top researchers and institutes, including Prof. Wolpaw at the New York State Dept of Health, Prof. Polich at The Scripps Research Institute, and Profs. Pfurtscheller and Neuper at Graz University of Technology. He is a Founding Board Member of the BCI Society and editor of the BCI Journal.>>Read More

Video


Oct
22

Miguel ISTeC Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series
Laws for Cybersecurity?
Speaker: Fred B. Schneider, Eckert Professor of Computer Science, Computer Science, Cornell University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, October 22, 2018

Where: Morgan Library Event Hall

Contact: Indrakshy Ray (Indrakshi.Ray@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Cyber-security today is focused largely on defending against known attacks. We learn about the latest attack and find a patch to defend against it. Our defenses thus improve only after they have been successfully penetrated. This is a recipe to ensure some attackers succeed---not a recipe for achieving system trustworthiness. >>Read More

Bio: Fred B. Schneider is Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University. He joined Cornell's faculty in Fall 1978 and served as department chair from 2014-2018, having completed a Ph.D. at Stony Brook University and a B.S. in Engineering at Cornell in 1975.>>Read More


Oct
23

Miguel Computer Science Department and Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Colloquium
Security from Tags
Speaker: Fred B. Schneider, Eckert Professor of Computer Science, Computer Science, Cornell University

When: 9:30AM ~ 10:30AM, Tuesday, October 23

Where: Clark A 202

Contact: Indrakshy Ray (Indrakshi.Ray@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Reference monitors generally restrict operation invocation. We discuss an alternative approach to security: enforcing restrictions that labels give about how a value may be used. A new class of reactive information flow (RIF) labels is useful, and we describe a static enforcement scheme. We also discuss run-time enforcement for chains of labels, including results that characterize the trade-off between chain length and permissiveness. >>Read More

Bio: Fred B. Schneider is Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University. He joined Cornell's faculty in Fall 1978 and served as department chair from 2014-2018, having completed a Ph.D. at Stony Brook University and a B.S. in Engineering at Cornell in 1975.>>Read More


Oct
29

Quynn Computer Science Department Colloquium
To Clearly Show Where No One Has Gone Before: Craft & Story & Science in Writing
Speaker: Kristina Quynn, Director, CSU Writes, Faculty in English & Graduate School

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, October 29, 2018

Where: CSB130

Abstract: High-quality and influential scientific articles (i.e., cited) and proposals (i.e., funded) contain many of the same features as high-quality and influential science fiction: specific and engaging characters, unexpected happenings, new understandings, and novel beginnings. >>Read More

Bio: Dr. Kristina Quynn is the founding Director of CSU Writes and a faculty member of the English Department and Graduate School at Colorado State University. Through CSU Writes, she works with faculty, postdoc, and graduate student writers from across all colleges and departments at CSU. >>Read More

Video


Nov
5

Partridge Computer Science Department Colloquium
Computing Systems Integrating Silicon Photonics:An Illusion or a Realistic Solution?
Speaker: Mahdi Nikdast, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, November 5, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Abstract: Computing systems play an important role in our daily lives. They are continuously scaling, and hence becoming more complicated, to satisfy new applications demands, such as higher computation and communication bandwidth required for big data and machine learning applications.>>Read More

Bio: Mahdi Nikdast is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Colorado State University (CSU). He received his Ph.D. in Electronic and Computer Engineering from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Hong Kong, in 2014. After his Ph.D., he started a Postdoctoral at Polytechnique Montreal and in collaboration with McGill University in Montreal, Canada.>>Read More

Video


Nov
26

Partridge Computer Science Department Colloquium
Creating a National Wireless Research Testbed
Speaker: Craig Partridge, Professor & Department Chair, Computer Science Department, Colorado State University

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, November 26, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Abstract: Imagine that on the campuses of 200 universities it was possible to experiment with new wireless protocols, on almost any radio frequency you wanted, without getting a license. Further imagine that any grad student could have a fully programmable experimental radio with which to conduct those experiments and that it was possible to buy more radios at a reasonable cost. For the past few years I've been working to make that vision a reality and in the past year I've been part of a team funded by NSF to plan our way towards the vision. In this talk I'll present the vision, how to make it reality, and discuss some of the research innovations we expect such a testbed might enable.

Bio: Dr. Craig Partridge is chair of the department of Computer Science at Colorado State University. Before he came to CSU, he was chief scientist for networking research at Raytheon BBN Technologies. Craig is a Fellow of the IEEE and ACM, a former chair of ACM SIGCOMM, and a member of the Internet Hall of Fame.

Video


Dec
3

Quinton Computer Science Department Colloquium
Revisiting Alpha and its Semantics
Speaker: Patrice Quinton, Patrice Quinton, Professor Emeritus, Ecole normale supérieure de Rennes, France (joint work with Tomofumi Yuki, INRIA researcher, Rennes)

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, December 3, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Contact: Sanjay Rajopadhye (Sanjay.Rajopadhye@ColoState.EDU)

Abstract: Alpha was designed in 1989 by Christophe Mauras to represent affine recurrence equations and to model the process of parallel architecture synthesis. Alpha is a specialized functional language, where computations are represented as fonctions on polyhedral domains. Alpha has been the basis of research on the so-called polyhedral model, both at IRISA Rennes, and at CSU by Prof. Rajopadhye’s research group. Prototype tools — MMAlpha in Rennes, Alphaz at CSU — were developed to target the generation of parallel code or the synthesis of parallel circuits. In this talk, I will present ongoing research aiming at revisiting the semantics of Alpha, in particular, concerning the structuration of the language using subsystems of equations. The goal of this research is to provide good foundations to the design of parallel programs or architectures using structured approaches using Alpha.

Bio: Patrice Quinton is Professor Emeritus at Ecole normale supérieure de Rennes (France), and member of IRISA. Former professor at Université de Rennes 1, and CNRS research director, he has been heading ENS Rennes from 2004 to 2015. His research interests are parallel architectures and high-level synthesis of hardware.


Dec
3

Singh Computer Science Department Colloquium
Rate Adaptive Wide Area Networks
Speaker: Rachee Singh, PhD Student, Computer Science, UMASS Amherst

When: 12:00PM ~ 1:00PM, December 3, 2018

Where: CSB130 map

Contact: Craig Partridge (Craig.Partridge@colostate.edu)

Abstract: Fiber optic cables connecting data centers are an expensive but important resource for large organizations. Their importance has driven a conservative deployment approach, with redundancy and reliability baked in at multiple layers. In this work, we take a more aggressive approach and argue for adapting the capacity of fiber optic links based on their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We investigate this idea by analyzing the SNR of over 8,000 links in an optical backbone for a period of three years. We show that the capacity of 64% of 100 Gbps IP links can be augmented by at least 75 Gbps. Moreover, adapting link capacity to a lower rate can prevent up to 25% of link failures. Our analysis shows that using the same links, we get higher capacity, better availability, and 32% lower cost per gigabit per second. To accomplish this, we propose Rate Adaptive WAN (RADWAN), a traffic engineering system that allows optical links to adapt their rate based on the observed SNR to achieve higher throughput and availability while minimizing the churn during capacity reconfigurations. We evaluate RADWAN using a testbed consisting of 1,540 km fiber with 16 amplifiers and attenuators. We then simulate the throughput gains of RADWAN at scale and compare them to the gains of state-of-the-art traffic engineering systems. Our data-driven simulations show that RADWAN improves the overall network throughput by 40% while also improving the average link availability.

Web Page: http://www.racheesingh.com


Dec
7

Rajopadhye Computer Science Department Colloquium
CS793 Rapid Fire Presentation
Speakers: CS793 Graduate Students

When: 11:00AM ~ 11:50AM, Dec 7, 2018

Where: CSB130 map